Thursday, 14 June 2012

Sultan of Selangor

From Wikipedia: Sultan of Selangor

The Bugis
The sultans of Selangor are descended from a Bugis dynasty that claim descent from the rulers of Luwu in the southern part of Celebes (today known as Sulawesi). Nobles from this bloodline were involved in the dispute over the Johor-Riau Sultanate in the early 18th century, eventually placing their full support in the cause of Sultan Abdul Jalil of the Bendahara dynasty against the claimant to the Malaccan lineage, Raja Kechil. For this reason, the Bendahara rulers of Johor-Riau established close relations with the Bugis nobles, providing them with titles and control over many areas within the empire, including Selangor. 

Daeng Chelak
The history of the sultans of Selangor begins with Daeng Chelak. Daeng Chelak's prince, Raja Lumu arrived in Selangor and founded a new government at Kuala Selangor in 1766. He was installed by the Sultan of Perak as Sultan Salehuddin Shah and became the first Sultan of Selangor.


1. Sultan Salahuddin Shah (Raja Lumu; 1745-1778)
2. Sultan Ibrahim Shah of Selangor (Raja Ibrahim; 1778-1826)
3. Sultan Muhammad Shah (Raja Muhammad; 1826-1857)
4. Sultan Sir Abdul Samad (Raja Abdul Samad; 1857-1896)
5. Sultan Sir Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah (Tengku Sulaiman Shah; 1896-1937)
6. Sultan Sir Hisamuddin Alam Shah Al-Haj (Tengku Alam Shah; 1937-1942, 1945-1960)
7. Sultan Musa Ghiatuddin Riayat Shah (Tengku Musaeddin; during Japanese occupation 1942-1945)
8. Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Al-Haj (Tengku Abdul Aziz Shah; 1960-2001)
9. Sultan Sharafuddin Idris Shah Al-Haj (Tengku Idris Shah; 2001-current)


1. Sultan Salahuddin Shah (Raja Lumu bin Daeng Chelak; 1745-1778)
Raja Lumu (Sultan Sallehuddin Shah ibni Almarhum Daeng Chelak; 1705–1778) was the first Sultan of Selangor. He was the son of the famous Bugis warrior prince Daeng Chelak. He took on the title of Sultan Sallehuddin of Selangor in 1742. The Bugis had already begun to settle on the West coast of the Malayan Peninsula towards the end of the 17th century.

Following Raja Lumu, two other Bugis Chiefs settled in the Selangor area: Raja Tua in Klang and Daeng Kemboja in Linggi, south of Lukut. Raja Lumu originally met with opposition from the Sultans of Perak and Johor, as well as from the Dutch, but eventually managed to consolidate his position as sovereign. By 1770, his legitimacy was strengthened by marriage to the niece of the Sultan of Perak.

The latter, Sultan Muhammad "invested Salehuddin with the insignia of Malay royalty and also attended the subsequent installation ceremony in Selangor". To this alliance, he soon added another, by marrying his own daughter to the Sultan of Kedah, the most northerly of the Western Malay Sultanates.


2. Sultan Ibrahim Shah of Selangor (Raja Ibrahim bin Raja Lumu; 1778-1826)
No update


3. Sultan Muhammad Shah (Raja Muhammad bin Raja Ibrahim; 1826-1857)
Sultan Muhammad Shah, (Almarhum Sultan Muhammad Shah ibni Almarhum Sultan Ibrahim Shah; ? - 6 January 1857) was the third Sultan of Selangor. His reign lasted 31 years until his death and saw the opening of tin mines in Ampang and the separation of Selangor into five independent districts.

Muhammad Shah was not the son of his father's first wife, but since he was made the heir presumptive during his father's reign, Selangor dignitaries accepted him as the next Sultan of Selangor. 

Sultan Muhammad Shah was not as competent in governing the state and did not have total control over local rajas, village leaders or their districts. By the end of his rule, Selangor was separated into five individual territories, namely Bernam, Kuala Selangor, Kelang, Langat and Lukut. Each area was governed by different leaders and Muhammad Shah only controlled Kuala Selangor. 

Chinese settlers started mining for tin in the state during his time. The setting up of tin mines in Ampang brought business to the people and this was to be his only recognized success.


4. Sultan Sir Abdul Samad (Raja Abdul Samad bin Raja Abdullah; 1857-1896)
Sultan Abdul Samad, KCMG (Almarhum Sultan Sir Abdul Samad ibni Almarhum Raja Abdullah; 1804 - 6 February 1898) was the fourth Sultan of Selangor.

Abdul Samad was born in 1804 at Bukit Melawati in Selangor to Raja Abdullah ibni Ibrahim Shah, younger brother of Sultan Muhammad Shah. His reign lasted 41 years from 1857 until his death in 1898. His time on the throne saw the only civil war in Selangor, the establishment of Kuala Lumpur, the introduction of the Selangor flag and coat of arms and the start of British involvement in Selangor state affairs.

Before becoming the Sultan of Selangor, Abdul Samad held the title of Tengku Panglima Raja and held authority over Langat. 

The third sultan of Selangor, Sultan Muhammad Shah, died on 6 January 1857 without appointing an heir. This started a dispute between the royal court and dignitaries of Selangor to choose the next sultan. To select the next sultan Malay customs dictate that the son of a royal wife takes precedence over the sons of other wives. This makes Raja Mahmud the next legitimate heir but he was too young and was unable to exert his right. Sultan Muhammad's older and more competent sons, Raja Laut and Raja Sulaiman were sons of concubines, the Sultan's sons-in-law, Raja Jumaat and Raja Abdullah, were from the Riau branch of the family, hence they were all ineligible. This left Raja Abdul Samad, the nephew and son-in-law of the late Sultan, as the candidate with the strongest contention. Raja Jumaat and Raja Abdullah became convinced that they could become the power behind the throne if they supported Raja Abdul Samad to take the throne. With their patronage and the support of four other state dignitaries, a consensus was made to select the nephew of Sultan Muhammad Shah, Raja Abdul Samad Raja Abdullah.

Other sources state that Selangor went on for two years without a sultan until he was favoured and that, unlike his predecessors, he was not formally installed by the Sultan of Perak.

Following the successful establishment of the Ampang tin mines by Muhamad Shah, Sultan Abdul Samad used the tin ore to trade with the states of the Straits Settlements. The mines in turn attracted even more Chinese miners with the help of Raja Abdullah bin Raja Jaafar, one of his son-in-laws and Yap Ah Loy, a Chinese Kapitan.

In 1866, the Sultan gave Raja Abdullah the power and authority over Klang. This fueled the feud between Raja Abdullah and Raja Mahadi, who was the previous administrator of Klang. The dispute led to the Klang War. The Sultan appointed his son-in-law, Tengku Dhiauddin Zainal Rashid (a.k.a. Tengku Kudin), as Vice Yamtuan and arbitrator twice during the war; first on 26 June 1868 and again on 22 July 1871. At the same time he handed over management of the entire state. He also provided Langat to Tengku Kudin to help him fund the handling of the war. Tengku Kudin in turn engaged the help of Pahang, mercenaries and Sir Andrew Clarke of the British Empire. This marked the first British involvement in local politics. The Sultan later handed over the ruling power of Klang to Tungku Kudin after the war was won in 1874. In 1878 Tengku Kudin stood down from this post.

After a number of piracy attacks took place in Selangor, Andrew Clarke assigned Frank Swettenham as a live-in advisor to Sultan Abdul Samad in August 1874. Sultan Abdul Samad accepted James Guthrie Davidson as the first British Resident of Selangor in 1875. In October the same year, Sultan Abdul Samad sent a letter to Andrew Clarke requesting for Selangor to be placed under the British protectorate. During his reign, the areas of Semenyih, Beranang and Broga went under Selangor jurisdiction. Lukut however was handed to Dato' Kelana of Sungai Ujong on 30 July 1880. 

The Sultan was awarded the Order of St Michael and St George (KCMG) conferring the title Sir. Jugra became the royal capital of Selangor when Sultan Abdul Samad built the Jugra Palace and moved there in 1875. The state capital was moved from Klang to Kuala Lumpur in 1880.

In 1893, he helped found one of Malaysia's premier schools, Victoria Institution in Kuala Lumpur along with Kapitan Yap Kwan Seng, K. Thamboosamy and Loke Yew. Sultan Abdul Samad was made one of the first two patrons of the school.

Sultan Abdul Samad was a member of the Council of Rulers for the Federated Malay States, under the British colonial regime. The sultans of the four Federated Malay States of Perak, Selangor, Negeri Sembilan, and Pahang were represented at the first Durbar, which convened in 1897 at Kuala Kangsar, Perak.

Sultan Abdul Samad interacted openly with his people as observers noted that he mingled by chatting in local markets, while taking his daily walks or while watching a cockfight.

Sultan Abdul Samad died on 6 February 1898 at the age of 93 after reigning for 41 years. He was laid to rest in his own mausoleum in Jugra. He had 12 children, 6 princes and 6 princesses from two wives. Raja Muda Musa, the heir apparent, died in 1884. Due to this the next in line is Raja Muda Musa's eldest son, Sulaiman Shah Musa.

The Sultan Abdul Samad Building in Kuala Lumpur, Sultan Abdul Samad Secondary School in Petaling Jaya and the Sultan Abdul Samad Library in Universiti Putra Malaysia are named after him.



Almarhum Sultan Sir Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah ibni Almarhum Raja Muda Musa GCMG, KCVO, (11 September 1863-31 March 1938) was the fifth Sultan of Selangor from 1898 until 1938. He was previously known as Tengku Sulaiman Shah before being crowned Sultan.

Sultan Sulaiman was knighted the Order of St Michael and St George (GCMG) by the United Kingdom in 1912 with the title Sir.

The Sultan's rule was marked by Selangor joining the Federated Malay States, a federation of four protected states in the Malay Peninsula, including Perak, Negeri Sembilan and Pahang, established by the British government in 1895, which lasted until 1946.

It was during Sultan Sulaiman's reign that Istana Alam Shah was built in 1905. The Sultan went on to live in the palace for 35 years until his death in 1938.

Sultan Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah had many children, his first three sons in chronological order being Tengku Musa Eddin, Tengku Badar Shah and Tengku Alam Shah. The first two sons were children by his royal consort, Tengku Ampuan Maharum binti Tengku Dhiauddin of the royal house of Kedah. In 1903, Tunku Musa Eddin had been made Tengku Mahkota and was promoted to Raja Muda or heir apparent in 1920.

However, at the instigation of the British Resident, Theodore Samuel Adams (1885–1961; in office 1935 - 1937), Tengku Musa Eddin was dismissed as Raja Muda in 1934 for alleged "misbehaviour". Adams had accused Tengku Musa Eddin as a spendthrift and wastrel with a penchant for gambling. However, many Malays in Selangor believed the real reason for Tengku Musa Eddin's dismissal was his refusal to follow Adam's orders.

Although Sultan Sulaiman pleaded for the case of Tengku Musa Eddin (even petitioning the Secretary of State for the Colonies and discussing the issue directly with him in London), Tengku Alam Shah was instead proclaimed Raja Muda or heir to the throne over the head of his other half-brother Tengku Badar. The appointment occurred on 20 July 1936.

Tengku Alam Shah was proclaimed Sultan on 4 April 1938, four days after the death of Sultan Sulaiman. On 26 January 1939, he was crowned at Istana Mahkota Puri in Klang. Tengku Musa Eddin, then Tengku Kelana Jaya Putera, presided over the ceremony with no ill feelings.



Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah ibni Almarhum Sultan Alaiddin Sulaiman Shah KCMG (13 May 1898 - 1 September 1960) was the second Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia from 14 April to 1 September 1960, and fifth and seventh Sultan of Selangor between 1938–1942 and again from 1945-1960.

He was the first son of Almarhum Sultan Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah ibni Almarhum Raja Muda Musa (1893–1938) by Cik Puan Hasnah binti Pilong, a commoner wife. Named Tengku Alam Shah at birth, he was not expected to succeed as he had two elder half-brothers.

Educated at the Malay College Kuala Kangsar, he was instrumental in the establishment of the Malay College Old Boys Association(MCOBA) in 1929. In 1931, he was appointed Tengku Laksamana of Selangor, having previously served as Tengku Panglima Raja.

Sultan Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah had many children, his first three sons in chronological order being Tengku Musa Eddin, Tengku Badar Shah and Tengku Alam Shah. The first two sons were children by his royal consort, Tengku Ampuan Maharum binti Tengku Dhiauddin of the royal house of Kedah. In 1903, Tunku Musa Eddin had been made Tengku Mahkota and was promoted to Raja Muda or heir apparent in 1920.

However, at the instigation of the British Resident, Theodore Samuel Adams (1885–1961; in office 1935 - 1937), Tengku Musa Eddin was dismissed as Raja Muda in 1934 for alleged "misbehaviour". Adams had accused Tengku Musa Eddin as a spendthrift and wastrel with a penchant for gambling. However, many Malays in Selangor believed the real reason for Tengku Musa Eddin's dismissal was his refusal to follow Adam's orders.

Although Sultan Sulaiman pleaded for the case of Tengku Musa Eddin (even petitioning the Secretary of State for the Colonies and discussing the issue directly with him in London), Tengku Alam Shah was instead proclaimed Raja Muda or heir to the throne over the head of his other half-brother Tengku Badar. The appointment occurred on 20 July 1936.

Tengku Alam Shah was proclaimed Sultan on 4 April 1938, four days after the death of his father. On 26 January 1939, he was crowned at Istana Mahkota Puri in Klang. Tengku Musa Eddin, then Tengku Kelana Jaya Putera, presided over the ceremony.

On 15 January 1942, Col. Fujiyama, the Japanese Military Governor of Selangor, invited Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah to King's House in Kuala Lumpur. In an interview with Major-General Minaki the Sultan confessed that he had made speeches in support of the British war efforts but had been persuaded by the British resident to do so. After being told to surrender the regalia to his older brother, the Japanese removed Sultan Alam Shah and in November 1943, proclaimed Tengku Musa Eddin as the new Sultan Musa Ghiatuddin Riayat Shah of Selangor.

Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah declined to work with the Japanese and from 1943, refused their allowance awarded to him and his children.

The return of the British finally brought Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah back to the throne, while ex-Sultan Musa was exiled to the Cocos Keeling Islands. Although he had signed the Malayan Union treaty, like all other Malay rulers, he later repudiated it and gave open support to Malay nationalist effort to overthrow the plan.

On 1 March 1946, Sultan Alam Shah officiated the First Malay Unity Congress at the Sultan Sulaiman Club in Kuala Lumpur which was instrumental in creating UMNO. The Congress was organised by the Selangor Malay Society (PMS) which had as its president the scholar Zainal Abidin Ahmad (Za'ba), a critic of British colonial rule.

On 3 August 1957, by eight votes to one, Sultan Alam Shah was elected Deputy Yang di-Pertuan Agong of independent Malaya.

Sultan Alam Shah was elected second Yang di-Pertuan Agong or federal Paramount Ruler of independent Malaya (the present Malaysia before the accession of British North Borneo, Sarawak and Singapore in 1963) on the death of Tuanku Abdul Rahman. His term of office began on 14 April 1960. On 30 July 1960 he proclaimed the end of the Emergency in Malaya.

Sultan Alam Shah died from an unidentified illness at Istana Tetamu in Kuala Lumpur on 1 September 1960, aged 62, the day fixed for his installation. He was interred at the Royal Mausoleum near Sultan Sulaiman Mosque in Klang, Selangor on 3 September 1960.

Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah was married at least twice: (i) in 1920 to Raja Jemaah binti Raja Ahmad (1900–1973), a member of a junior branch of the Selangor royal family, who served as Tengku Ampuan of Selangor and Raja Permaisuri Agong; (ii) in 1927 to Kalsom binti Mahmud (1913–1990), who was the mother to Tengku Ampuan Besar Bariah of Terengganu.

He was succeeded by his son by Raja Jemaah, Tengku Abdul Aziz Shah, as Sultan of Selangor, taking the title of Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah. Sultan Salahuddin later became the 11th Yang di-Pertuan Agong and also died while in office like his father.

King George V Silver Jubilee Medal, 1935
King George VI Coronation Medal, 1937
Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (KCMG), 1938
Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Medal, 1953
Order of the Crown of State (DMN), 1958

Kolej Islam Sultan Alam Shah (previously known as Kolej Islam Kelang), was named after him.
Sekolah Alam Shah (now Sekolah Sultan Alam Shah), first in Cheras and then in Putrajaya, was named after him.
The City of Shah Alam and Istana Alam Shah in Klang was also named in his honour.
Jalan Sultan Hisamuddin (formerly Victory Avenue), Kuala Lumpur was named after him
His reign was the shortest ever for any Yang di-Pertuan Agong, lasting only 139 days. His son's reign, from 21 September 1999 and 21 November 2001 was the second shortest at two years and sixty two days.
He is the only Yang di-Pertuan Agong never to have been officially installed.
He is the only Yang di-Pertuan Agong who never lived at Istana Negara, Kuala Lumpur.
He was the last Yang di-Pertuan Agong to read the Friday sermon himself.


7. Sultan Musa Ghiatuddin Riayat Shah (Tengku Musa Eddin bin Tengku Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah; during Japanese occupation 1942-1945)

Almarhum Sultan Musa Ghiatuddin Riayat Shah ibni Almarhum Sultan Sir Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah (1893–1955) was Sultan of Selangor in Malaysia during the Japanese occupation of that state (1942–1945). He received the Order of the Rising Sun from the Emperor of Japan.

The eldest son of Sultan Alaeddin (1898–1938) by his royal consort Tengku Ampuan Maharum binti Raja Muda Tunku Dziauddin of Kedah, he was born in Jugra, Selangor. His name at birth was Tengku Musa Eddin.

Educated privately, he was made Tengku Mahkota in 1903. He succeeded his father's great-uncle Raja Laut bin Sultan Muhammad as Raja Muda or Crown Prince of Selangor in 1920. An intelligent young man, he represented his father on the State Council established by the British colonial authority.

However, at the instigation of the British Resident, Theodore Samuel Adams (1885–1961; in office 1935 - 1937), Tengku Musa Eddin was dismissed as Raja Muda in 1934 for alleged "misbehaviour". Adams had accused Tengku Musa Eddin as a spendthrift and wastrel with a penchant for gambling. However, many Malays in Selangor believed the real reason for Tengku Musa Eddin's dismissal was his refusal to follow Adam's orders.

Although Sultan Sulaiman pleaded for the case of Tengku Musa Eddin (even petitioning the Secretary of State for the Colonies and discussing the issue directly with him in London), Tengku Alam Shah was instead proclaimed Raja Muda or heir to the throne over the head of his other half-brother Tengku Badar. The appointment occurred on 20 July 1936.

Tengku Musa Eddin was given the title of Tengku Kelana Jaya Putera, ironically the title for the heir-apparent of the Yang di-Pertuan Muda (or Under-King) of Johor and Riau, from which the Sultans of Selangor are descended.

Tengku Alam Shah was proclaimed Sultan on 4 April 1938, four days after the death of his father. On 26 January 1939, he was crowned at Istana Mahkota Puri in Klang. Tengku Musa Eddin presided over the ceremony with no ill feelings.

During the Japanese occupation of Malaya, on 15 January 1942, Col. Fujiyama, the Japanese Military Governor of Selangor, invited Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah to King's House in Kuala Lumpur. In an interview with Major-General Minaki the Sultan confessed that he had made speeches in support of the British war efforts but had been persuaded by the British resident to do so.

After being told to surrender the regalia to his older brother, the Japanese removed Sultan Hisamuddin and in November 1943, proclaimed Tengku Musa Eddin as the new Sultan of Selangor, taking the regnal name Sultan Musa Ghiatuddin Riayat Shah.

Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah declined to work with the Japanese and from 1943, refused their allowance awarded to him and his children.

After the war, Sultan Musa in turn was dethroned by the British Military Administration under Lord Louis Mountbatten upon the return of the colonial power to Malaya in 1945. Sultan Hisamuddin was installed again as Sultan of Selangor.

Sultan Musa was exiled to the Cocos Keeling Islands. Subsequently, he fell ill and was brought back to Selangor a few months before his death in 1955. Sultan Musa was buried beside his father at the Royal Mausoleum in Klang. His consort, Syarifah Mastura Shahabuddin of Kedah, became Tengku Permaisuri or Queen during his brief reign. She died in 1958. The couple had no children.


8. Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Al-Haj (Tengku Abdul Aziz Shah bin Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah Al-Haj; 1960-2001)

Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Al-Haj ibni Hisamuddin Alam Shah Al-Haj (8 March 1926 – 21 November 2001) was the eleventh Yang di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia and eighth Sultan of Selangor.

Born Tengku Abdul Aziz Shah on 8 March 1926 at Istana Bandar Temasya, Kuala Langat, he is the eldest son of Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah Al-Haj ibni Almarhum Sultan Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah by his royal consort Tengku Ampuan Raja Jemaah binti Raja Ahmad.

He received his early education at the Pengkalan Batu Malay School in Klang in 1934. In 1936 he furthered his studies at the Malay College Kuala Kangsar until 1941 when World War II began. After World War II, he went to England in 1947 and studied at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London for two years.

Upon his return from the United Kingdom, he served with the Civil Service Department as a Trainee Officer with the Selangor Survey Department. He later served as an Inspector of Schools for eight years.
In 1952, he attended a short-term course at the Malay Military Troop in Port Dickson for six months and was commissioned with the Queen Commission in the rank of captain. Thereafter, he was promoted to the rank of major.

Marriages

Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah married at least four wives.

His first wife and cousin, Raja Nur Saidatul Ihsan binti Tengku Bendahara Badar, whom he later divorced, bore:
Tengku Nor Halija
Tengku Idris Shah, later Sultan Sharafuddin Idris Shah
Tengku Puteri Sofiah
Tengku Panglima Diraja Sulaiman Shah
Tengku Puteri Zahariah (Ku Yah)
Tengku Fatimah
Tengku Panglima Besar Abdul Samad
Tengku Puteri Arafiah
Tengku Puteri Aishah

Che Maheram Bt Muhammad Rais, his second wife, bore him:
Tengku Indera Setia Ahmad Shah

His royal consort, Tengku Ampuan Rahimah binti Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah of the Langkat royal family in Sumatra died in 1993 before his election as Yang di-Pertuan Agong. She was the mother of:
Tengku Puteri Nor Marina
Tengku Puteri Nor Zehan

His last wife, commoner Tuanku Siti Aishah binti Abdul Rahman, served as his Raja Permaisuri Agong. Being fifty years younger than him, she was also the youngest ever occupant of that office - only 29 at her succession to the throne.

Hobbies and Interests

Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah was a keen sportsman. His interest in golf is well-known within and outside the country. The Sultan also loved sailing, collecting antique cars, rearing animals and planting orchids. He also likes visiting foreign countries to widen his knowledge and experience.

Sultan

Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah was appointed as the Tengku Laksamana of Selangor on 1 August 1946 and as the Raja Muda (Crown Prince) of Selangor on 13 May 1950.

On the demise of his father, Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah Al-Haj ibni Almarhum Sultan Alaeddin Sulaiman Shah, Tengku Abdul Aziz Shah became the eighth Sultan of Selangor with the title Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah on 3 September 1960 and was installed as the 28th Sultan on 28 June 1961.

On 26 April 1984, Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah was appointed as Captain-in-Chief of the Royal Navy by the Malaysian Armed Forces in place of the position of Colonel-in-Chief of the Malaysian Royal Air Force which he held since 1966.

Sultan Salahuddin was the Sultan who signed the cession of Kuala Lumpur from Selangor to the Federal Government to form a Federal Territory on 1 February 1974. The Sultan cried after the signing as he was very fond and proud of the city, but he did it for the greater good of Malaysia. The Kota Darul Ehsan arch was erected along the Federal Highway at the border of Kuala Lumpur and Selangor to commemorate the event in 1981.

Sultan Salahuddin was a founder of Shah Alam, the new Selangor state capital in 1978. He said that for Selangor to become a modern state, it would need a new state capital as Kuala Lumpur had become a Federal Territory. At that time Klang was the state capital after the cession of Kuala Lumpur when the Sultan founded Shah Alam. Many buildings and roads in Shah Alam are named after him.

Yang di-Pertuan Agong

He was the oldest ruler to be elected as the eleventh Yang di-Pertuan Agong on 26 April 1999 and installed on 11 September 1999.

The cession of Putrajaya, which was formerly Selangor territory, to the Federal Government in 2001 to become a Federal Territory occurred during his reign as Yang di-Pertuan Agong. The Persiaran Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah in Putrajaya was named after him.

However, after reigning for two years and 6 months, he died in office on 21 November 2001 at the Gleneagles Intan Medical Centre in Kuala Lumpur. He underwent a heart operation to put a pacemaker two months prior to his death, which he did not fully recover from.

He was buried in the Royal Mausoleum near Sultan Sulaiman Mosque in Klang.

Salahuddin held the rank of Marshal of the Royal Malaysian Air Force as per constitution

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